Many Americans still can’t be sure they will be treated equally when they seek goods or services from businesses in their local communities. Far too often, we still hear stories of discrimination, like people of color facing abuse and violence in a diner, a gay couple being kicked out of an Uber, Muslim women ordered to leave a cafe or people with disabilities being harassed in a restaurant.

A time of promise

Even the United States Supreme Court has yet to put this issue to rest as cake shops, florists and vacation rental owners fight for the legal right to refuse service to same-sex couples. While this remains a time of uncertainty, it’s also a time of promise. Businesses can reject these deep divisions and take a stand for fairness. Corporate leaders have the power and economic imperative to support non-discrimination and to be a voice for inclusion in these turbulent times. 

No one should be turned away from a business simply because of who they are.

That’s not only good for America, it’s also good for business. 

That’s why nearly 2,000 leading businesses and over 200 nonprofits have joined together to declare that they are “open to all” regardless of race, ethnicity, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, religion or disability.

Nonprofit leaders include the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights; the NAACP-LDF; the Anti-Defamation League; Out & Equal; and many more.

More and more businesses are joining leaders like Gap, Marriott International, Levi Strauss and Co., Lyft and Yelp by signing the “Open to All Business Pledge,” using the new “Open to All” attribute on Yelp and, for businesses with brick-and-mortar locations, placing “Open to All” stickers on their windows.

Because no one should be turned away from a business simply because of who they are.