For over 35 years, 20 consumer law print treatises have been the definitive resource on all consumer law topics, including consumer bankruptcy, debt collection, credit reporting, foreclosures, predatory lending, automobile fraud and student loans. New digital, expanded content surrounding these topics is now offered online. The library’s powerful new digital tools dramatically increase the treatises’ utility to practitioners.

A range of updates

The digital age has changed the look of practicing law.

The full treatise is available as a digital edition, allowing consumer law experts to update the digital text within hours of breaking consumer law developments. Recent updates, important consumer law changes, and changes since the print edition are all highlighted so readers can instantly see what is new and updated. Text, footnotes (such as long string cites) and appendices can be copy/pasted, downloaded and printed, and even emailed.

Further, advanced search options allow readers to rapidly find and access relevant text in any of the 20 titles. Users can annotate, highlight, and bookmark text for their own use, always returning to those marked-up pages when desired. Included with the digital editions are thousands of sample pleadings (in Word format for easy adaption for actual cases), hard-to-find primary sources and practice tools — all searchable and linked in the text. Treatises are specially formatted for mobile devices, so that the full content and all digital features are available for those on the go.

New case connector

The digital age has changed the look of practicing law. The recently published treatise “Fair Debt Collection” includes a highly effective digital tool: The FDCPA Case Connector. Over 14,000 summaries of FDCPA decisions are included in this flexible, relational database, in which users can filter or sort by any combination of court, topic, year, party name or keyword to find summaries of cases of interest.

Digital first chapters

The Digital Library allows for flexibility and accessibility. Readers can now explore both the treatises’ digital tools and content by delving into the first chapter of any title in the Digital Library.