Face-to-face meetings are as common in Silicon Valley as they are on Wall Street. While it’s easy to assume that those who create virtual communications also rely on them to close business deals and build customer relationships, the truth is that tech leaders leverage in-person meetings too. Like their counterparts in other industries, they use meetings to win new business, increase visibility and cultivate ideas.

In such a rapidly expanding industry, tech leaders are expected to innovate unceasingly, minimize security risks, navigate a complex regulatory landscape and attract and nurture new talent. They must be vigilant about opportunities for short- and long-term growth. Meanwhile, their employees are often separated by hundreds or thousands of miles and juggling competing needs for their attention.

Bringing people together

“Meetings force you to get together to talk, [and] when you do, then stuff gets done.”

Today’s tech leaders know that to move ahead, they must bring people together. Since Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak first sat in a garage to sketch out the idea that became Apple, face-to-face meetings have driven the tech industry forward. When industry executives and workers, developers and designers, and clients and consumers come together, they exchange ideas, identify needs and brainstorm solutions. Meetings foster creativity and strong interpersonal relationships —the core of every business decision.

Face-to-face meetings also provide industry leaders with opportunities to connect with those outside of their organizations. Interacting with customers at trade shows, conferences or special events builds trust and loyalty — an invaluable component of long-term success. Such meetings also enable leaders to build partnerships by providing opportunities to expand offerings, embrace new customer bases and grow revenue.

Whether these leaders are navigating challenges in cybersecurity, regulatory policy, talent management or market entry, face-to-face meetings equip them with the tools for success. As Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said, “Meetings force you to get together to talk, [and] when you do, then stuff gets done.”