Takeo Spikes’ first job out of college was professional football player. Now the former All-Pro linebacker is settling into the second act of life, this time as an author and a photographer.

Transitioning from work to unstructured time can be difficult. Having a second act helps the transition. It’s the time in life to follow your passion.

“Your second act should bring joy to your life.”

“A second act means you’ve found a new niche in one of your passions, and it can be crafted into a business if you choose to monetize it,” said Spikes. “It’s a new sense of dedication, worth and drive for success that builds off of motivation and education from your first act, or career.”

Do what you love

The road to success is often tedious, difficult and emotional. If you don’t love what you’re doing, the hard work becomes such a grind that you don’t push yourself to your full potential. “It may sound cliché, but it is most important to do what you love because you will never look at it as work,” said Spikes. 

When you plan your second act, look for a passion that invigorates you and holds your attention, then build a business model around it. It won’t necessarily be easy to create this second career, but your second act should bring joy to your life.

Rely on your teammates

Although Spikes was a great football player, he relied on his teammates make him even more efficient at his craft. Surrounding yourself with the right people, people who make you even better at what you do, is just as important in the second act. 

ALL ABOUT TEAMWORK: Spikes preaches the importance of a great support system in finding success, whether it's your first or second act. “Find people you trust and can count on, and people who can execute.”


“Find people you trust and can count on, and people who can execute,” Spikes advised. “It is important to surround yourself with people who are educated and learn from that.”

Building your team begins during the first act when you start building your finances for retirement. One of your first recruits should be a financial advisor who can help you plan for the second act. When you have a clearer picture of the direction your second act will follow, your advisor can direct you on the best money management strategies.